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GeneralLiberia news

Candidates sign nonviolence commitment 

By Naneka Hoffman

Liberian Presidential Candidates, including incumbent President George Manneh Weah, have signed a commitment before the Board of Commissioners of the National Elections Commission to conduct violent-free campaigns ahead of the October 10th elections. 

They penned the commitment Wednesday, August 2, 2023, during a day-long intensive and interactive forum attended by 19 Presidential aspirants and delegates from the Economic Community of West African States ECOWAS and the United Nations on promoting peaceful elections in the country on the theme: “Building the confidence of Presidential candidates in the working of the NEC.”

Making remarks, President Weah notes that it was an honor for him to stand before fellow participants as President of Liberia and also a candidate, seeking a second term.

He recalls that the Farmington Declaration which they had earlier signed in Margib County, is not just a piece of paper, but a solemn pledge to uphold democracy, peace, and inclusiveness.

Mr. Weah further notes that together through that document, they made a promise to the people of Liberia to create an environment free of violence for transparent elections, underscoring that they must therefore, live by examples in ensuring the pending elections are transparent and fair.

The President adds that by that singular act, they guarantee unrestricted rights to every citizen to exercise his or her franchise each day as they approach the October 10 General and Presidential elections.

“Let us remember that the success of these elections doesn’t surely rest on me or any single individual; it requires the full and committed participation of all of our citizens and the support of our friendly partners”, President Weah says noting that as political leaders, their collective interest in the wellbeing of Liberia must always remain paramount.

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Earlier, NEC chairperson Davidetta Browne-Lansanah disclosed that the Commission has instituted measures to ensure free campaigning by contestants.

She says part of that effort is to work with political parties to come out with campaign guidelines.

Madam Lansanah reveals that the Commission has documented aspirants, who posted flyers in the streets, including photographs in breach of the electoral law not just in Monrovia, but in the counties.

She says the NEC has approached those involved and they will face adjudication after which violators will be fined in accordance with law.

She adds that formal communications were written by some of the violators, who have subsequently argued that the NEC cannot fine because the matter is already before the court. Editing by Jonathan Browne

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3 Comments

  1. Liberia’s election in October 2023 should be most on the minds of ECOWAS. We should not interfere by force if an incident is caused by the will of a people. Ask and find the reason. West Africa can find their own solution. It is beginning to be the actual peace pipe and we must not go back to the days of mansa musa and yansosakpasee. Let us see the truth of the ballot box.

  2. As for the situation in Niger, ECOWAS chaired by Tinubu should be himself and get to the palaver hut with several meetings to resolve the issue. If it is the will of Nigeriens that the same people who put a leader in could be the same to oust, then. Sunday is risky and short. Invite both parties to the hut. This is African regardless military or civil. An empirical formula based on past Liberia could suffice. There is a reason for everything in a culture.

  3. As for the situation in Niger, ECOWAS chaired by Tinubu should be himself and get to the palaver hut with several meetings to resolve the issue. If it is the will of Nigeriens that the same people who put a leader in could be the same to oust, then. Sunday is risky and short. Invite both parties to the hut. This is African regardless military or civil. An empirical formula based on past Liberia could suffice.

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