Below the Header Ad
GeneralNews

Internet Society calls for legislation of end-to-end encryption law

Above Article Ad

By Lincoln G. Peters

Internet Society Liberia Chapter is appealing to the Government of Liberia through the Legislature to pass an end-to-end encryption law which is aimed at protecting information and individuals in the current digital dispensation.

The group over the weekend staged a major end-to-end encryption informative campaign to educate citizens about the danger of not being protected on the internet.

The outdoor campaign was launched to convince the government to close this loophole of unprotected internet and security in the society and to enhance privacy among users with an emphasis on the government ensuring the protection of all communications.

Encryption laws are laws when enacted must force companies like Apple, Google, Facebook, Samsung, and others to stop creating backdoor access to services and devices, making users’ data more vulnerable to hackers.

The group also petitioned the House of Representatives and the Executive branch of government to enact the bill which protects the fundamental human rights of all persons on the internet in the country.

Speaking in a press conference over the weekend, the President of Internet Society Liberia Chapter Mr. Matthew T. Roberts urged the government to support end-to-end encryption as the most effective way to ensure the personal security of billions of people and the national security of nations around the world.

“End-to-end encryption serves as a vital purpose in repressive states to protect journalists, human rights defenders, and other vulnerable people. We need end-to-end encryption law to protect our communications,” said Mr. Roberts. 

“End-to-end encryption is important because it provides users and recipients security for their email and files from the moment the data is sent … until the moment
it is received by the recipient,” Roberts continued.

Mr. Roberts noted that end-to-end encryption promotes data protection and prevents unauthorized access to personal data and information.

“We do not think we want criminals and hackers and predators getting into our government records, hospital records, court records, and energy infrastructure or to shut down the state,” he cautioned.–Edited by Winston W. Parley

Related Articles

Back to top button