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Kofi Woods joins war crimes debate

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Former Minister of Public Works and rights campaigner, Attorney Samuel Kofi Woods is challenging those Liberians accusing late Catholic Archbishop Michael K. Francis of supporting disbanded rebels Liberians United for Democracy and Reconciliation (LURD) to present documentary and photographic pieces of evidence in a court of records to provide their claims.
The disbanded LURD rebels group was one of the many warring factions in the Liberian Civil Conflict.

Attorney Woods gave the challenge here Monday, 27 August when he called on a local radio talk-show in Monrovia.

He says it was saddening that critics of the late Bishop Francis would venture in associating him with the former rebel group during the fourteen years civil war in Liberia which left over 250.000 people killed and infrastructure destroyed.

The former human rights advocate argues that it was unfair for individuals to brand the late Catholic Archbishop to supporting rebels when he was serving as peace maker to end wanton destruction of lives and properties.

He denies the late Archbishop Francis had association or link with any rebel group during the civil conflict, challenging anyone with documentary and photographic proofs to come out.
He stresses that it was necessary to make clarification following assertions by a female religious prelate that the late Bishop Michael Francis had offered prayers for the LURD rebels during the heat of the Liberian civil conflict.

Mother Dorothy Tucker Scholler, appearing as guest on the talk-show, says Liberia needs restorative justice which cannot be implemented in the absence of love amongst the people of Liberia.

But Attorney Woods maintains that he’s ready to defend the works of the late Bishop Francis, spoke harshly against societal ills, especially, the many unaccounted atrocities carried out by various warrant factions.

Meanwhile, several persons who called on the talk-show support calls for the establishment of War Crimes Court in Liberia, while others strongly oppose, arguing that such court was not necessary to avoid digging old wounds, which may plunge the country in chaos.

By Emmanuel Mondaye–Editing by Jonathan Browne

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