LP executive seeks justice for war victims

An official of the opposition Liberty Party (LP) says the remains of victims murdered in the Liberian Civil War would never rest in peace unless perpetrators or those responsible for their deaths are prosecuted for war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Speaking with reporters Tuesday, 4th September in Margibi County Dr. Marcus Pear says individuals and warlords who killed innocent people during the heat of the Liberian civil conflict should be made to account for their actions in the same minor in which jailed former Liberian President Charles Taylor has his days in court, and was adjudged guilty for aiding and abetting RUF rebels in Sierra Leone and sentenced.

Dr. Pear maintains that lasting peace in Liberia remains bleak unless those responsible for heinous crimes come face to face with victims’ relatives in a war crimes court.
The LP official, who sounds very frustrated over delay in establishing a war crimes court for Liberia, vows he will not rest in his quest for the establishment of such court where perpetrators would account for their roles.

He laments that it was unrealistic to see people, who are allegedly responsible for the death of innocent persons and destruction of the country move around freely in the presence of victims’ relatives.

Dr. Pear continues that there can’t be lasting peace in Liberia when those, who bear greatest responsibility for atrocities are not prosecuted, emphasizing that prosecution of war criminals would serve as deterrence for would-be combatants.

The 14 years civil crisis in Liberia was characterized by the formation of several armed factions, including the disbanded National Patriotic Front of Liberia (NPFL) of jailed ex-President Charles Taylor, Independent National Patriotic Front of Liberia (INPFL) of Nimba County Senator Prince Y. Johnson, Liberians United for Reconciliation and Democracy (LURD) of Sekou Damate Conneh, Liberia Peace Council (LPC) of Grand Gedeh County Representative Dr. George S. Boley, Lofa Defense Force (LDF), ULIMO-K of professor Alhaji G.V. Kromah and ULIMO-J of the late Gen. Roosevelt Johnson, among others.
At least 250,000 people were killed and millions of dollars’ worth of properties destroyed during the prolonged brutal conflict.

By Emmanuel Mondaye

Show More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.