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MCC workers deny media report

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Workers at the Monrovia City Corporation (MCC) have strongly distanced themselves from media report that the newly nominated Lord Mayor of Monrovia Jefferson Koijee has taken office ahead of Liberian Senate confirmation hearing.


Speaking to the media Wednesday afternoon, 7 February, MCC Workers chairman Eric Doe said on 2 February, they hosted a welcoming and appreciation program for the mayor designate. 

But he says the event was being reported in the media that it was a turning over ceremony to the Youth Wing Chairman of ruling Coalition for Democratic Change (CDC).

“The program was to express gratitude to President George Manneh Weah for the preferment on a young Liberian whose track records speak of his ability to promote and advance the pro-poor agenda of the CDC – led government, and not a formal take over ceremony as being perceived in some quarters,” he says.

According to him, the MCC workers union is fully cognizant of the legislative procedures of the confirming of officials of government appointed by the president before formally beginning their official duties.

According to the 2008 census, the population density of the greater Monrovia District is 1,514 per square mile. Mr. Koijee, Monrovia’s youngest mayor designate said during the appreciation program that he will ensure that Monrovia is transformed.

Monrovia is the smallest human settlement land area but the largest urban center of the country because it is the national capital and experiences the highest urban migration.

Mr. Koijee also said his administration would continue to try to build trust between the city’s police force and its residents. Koijee said while he is thrilled by his preferment by President George Weah, he is however aware of the challenges.

However, he promised that if confirmed by the Senate, he will work to restructure the city from some of its problems, including de-congestion.

By E.J. Nathaniel Daygbor–Edited by Winston W. Parley

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