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MCSS boss frowns at private schools

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The Superintendent of the Monrovia Consolidated School System or MCSS Aldophus Benjamin Jacob says government is prepared to shut down any private school that will continuously violate the educational policy of Liberia.

Superintendent Jacob says as a matter of fact, it is government that issues permits to private schools to operate in the country, adding this alone should serve as a caveat to school authorities.

Speaking Tuesday, August 30, to this paper via mobile phone, Mr. Jacob indicated that it is the responsibility of government to monitor and ensure all schools operation in the country are in compliance with established policies.

He said, schools that are in the constant habit of graduating pupils before release of the West African Examination Council or WAEC’s results are actually placing the present and future generation of Liberians in a serious dilemma.

He noted that those graduates without WAEC documents go on and subsequently enroll in various colleges and universities in the country, and these institutions of higher learning care less to conduct background check on academic credentials submitted, but are only interested in increasing enrollment levels at their various institutions for the money sake, something he described as worrisome.

The MCSS boss further observed that nowadays, instructors are receiving bribes from pupils to give them passing marks, stressing the need to halt such practice or else, there will continue to be mass failure in the WAEC exams. “Teachers are receiving bride from pupils to give them passing marks after writing their exam or test,” he said.

He stressed that accepting pupils at various grade levels in high school without any background check to know whether they are really fit for those classes does not august well for the country.
You are mocking the students’ future teachers, when you receive monies from them for passing marks,” he lamented.

eanwhile, Superintendent Jacob has emphasized the need for private schools to be brought on the table to make them adhere to policies governing the educational system, saying “Whether government gives private schools subsidy or not, there is need that they adhere to higher authority’s policy in the country,” he concluded.

By Zee Roberts -Editing by Jonathan Browne

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