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Mysterious disappearance in Duazon

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A 63-year-old charcoal producer in Duazon, Lower Margibi County Alfred G. Weah, has mysteriously gone missing since Wednesday, March 17.The Town Chief of Duazon Emmanuel Blain, narrates to this paper that Mr. Weah, who had lived and produced charcoal in the town for the past 20 years, went across the St John River where he usually brunt coal but is yet to be found.Chief Blain explains that as a direct result of the situation, he has directed all men in Duazon to vigorously search nearby bushes and waterways in finding the missing man.

According to the chief, he saw Alfred G. Weah leaving the town with a small bag under his arm and a cutlass in his hand, walking toward his canoe and subsequently departed the town Wednesday, but had not returned.He laments that since the incident, his relatives along with residents of the town have been searching for his whereabouts.

Chief Blain notes that the situation has created serious fear amongst the residents, whom for the past twenty years, Mr. Weah had supplied with charcoal. Mr. Weah is father of five children, including Kpakay Weah who is also assisting community residents to find his dad.

However, the town chief discloses that mysteriously to the residents, while searching along the river bank they discovered Mr. Weah’s canoe, including a pair of rain booths, a sack of mineral water, and his clothes.

Chief Blain reveals that the matter was immediately reported to the Liberia National Police (LNP) authorities in Duazon, but the police have allegedly maintained they cannot go on the scene except the man was found.

A brother of Mr. Weah identified as Benson D. Hinneh, expresses shocks that his junior brother could face such fate. Alfred G. Weah hails from Maryland County, but settles in Duazon.

Benson explains that few days before the mysterious disappearance of his brother, he advised him to leave the charcoal production business because of his age and come live at his (Hinneh’s) residence in Paynesville which he promised to do. Mr. Hinneh says to his surprise, one of his nephews called and informed him that his brother went missing on March 17.

This reporter, who visited the Duazon waterside, which serves as transit point for charcoal and planks offloading, observed that Mr. Weah’s residence remained locked with some of his neighbors advising his family members not to break into the house.

When asked whether Weah and anyone in the town had any confusion or misunderstanding since he moved there, Town Chief Blain said no, adding that Mr. Weah had been a very friendly person loved by residents.
Meanwhile, police at the Duazon depot declined to comment on the matter, when contacted.

By Emmanuel Mondaye–Editing by Jonathan Browne

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