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President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf says Liberia has no intention of deploying troops in the global fight against terrorists. According to the President, the country already has troops in Mali.

“Absolutely not, we have no intention of [deploying] troops; we already have troops in Mali and that’s as much as we can do right now,” she told reporters at the Roberts International Airport recently upon her return from Kenya where Liberia had joined the World Trade Organization or WTO.

Regarding Liberia’s accession to the WTO, she said: “our team did an exceptional job and they were well-praised by everybody at the meeting”. Being the last West African country to access the WTO, Mrs. Sirleaf said, Liberia expects post-accession support, including technical assistance and help to complete required laws and rules to support the small and medium-sized businesses here, among others.

She underscored that government was working on improving the transportation system on grounds that the country had a lot of difficulties with shipping cost. “… But we got a support from all the major countries – US, China, Japan – all of whom said they will give support so that we can improve our training regime; we can improve our small and medium-sized businesses to enable them to do …. better packaging so they too can be able to export,” she indicated.

She concluded that accession to WTO was a long process requiring a country to go through many laws, protocols and make so many commitments regarding free trade, and opening the market.

Having signed cooperation with Kenya during the visit, President Sirleaf described the host country as a very strong agriculture country which, according to her, also has a very strong International Technology capacity.

“…By signing that, they can provide us some support in technical assistance. What we can do better in agriculture, how we can start some trade between Kenya and Liberia for those things that we’re importing from places outside of Africa, they could become a likened place for us to import from – that is more important,” she noted.

By Winston W. Parley-Edited by George Barpeen

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