Below the Header Ad
Other

Samuel Morris Scholar at GVL School

Above Article Ad

Golden Veroleum Liberia School in Butaw, Sinoe County has received 13 laptops from Innovative Education Liberia’s (IEL) Samuel Morris Scholars Program, an international charity organization committed to improving education in Liberia.

Partnering with GVL since 2014, the organization launched its computer-based learning program recently, targeting over 700 schools, three universities, 2,800 teachers and 135,000students. A press release issued by the company says the Samuel Morris Scholars program is named in honored of a Liberian prince, from what is now Sinoe County, who made his way to the United States and studied at the then faltering Taylor University in Indiana.

The prince, whose birth name was Kaboo (1873-1893), left Liberia in 1891. At the time Taylor University was on the verge of bankruptcy. According to University staff Morris’ life, once written and published in book form sold enough copies to keep the University afloat.

Morris died in 1893 after contracting a severe cold, his death inspired his fellow students to serve as missionaries to Africa on his behalf, fulfilling his dream of one day returning to minister to his own people. In 1996, Taylor University received over $3.15 million grant from Lilly Endowment, Inc. and established the Samuel Morris Scholars Program on its Fort Wayne, Indiana campus, describing the Liberian scholar as the one divinely sent by God to the University.

A born native of Sinoe County where GVL operates, IEL Country Director, Elijah Tarpeh, said the launch of the program was a new era in the educational sector of Liberia.  Speaking at the jammed-packed Sinoe Multilateral High school in the county, Tarpeh recalled his organization’s first move to GVL School in 2014, where the first computer based mathematics training was conducted for dozens of students. Since then student test scores have improved significantly, according to Tarpeh.

Accompanied by Professor Gary Friesen, the organization labeled GVL as a strong partner towards the successful implementation of its program in Liberia. “We are glad to have GVL with us as a true partner over the years, which has made us to be successful as a team,” said Friesen.

Using computerized learning tools, beneficiaries will learn character and leadership development as well as computer operations. Also in attendance, Sinoe County Education Officer, Malayee Charyee, praised the
program and pledged the county school system’s support to working closely with IEL in making it becomes successful.

Samuel Morris died in 1893 from complications of a respiratory infection. Morris’ life has been the subject of several novels, over a dozen biographies, a 1954 films, and a 1988 documentary. Taylor University has named numerous buildings, scholarships, and a society in his honor. His story helped to inspire other people to go to Africa with the goal of improving lives and conditions. -Press Release

Related Articles

Back to top button