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Sub-standard drugs flood Liberian market – pharmacist alarms

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A Liberian pharmacist, Mr. David Sumo, says sub-standard drugs on the Liberian market are killing people. Mr. Sumo says Liberia is being as a dumping ground for sub standard food and drugs. He calls on the Ministry of Commerce and Industry to thoroughly monitor or inspect goods coming to Liberia to ensure public safety.

Speaking at a daily press briefing at the Ministry of Information, Cultural Affairs and Tourism on Tuesday in Monrovia, the Liberia pharmacist noted that most of the drugs imported to Liberia are sub-standard, including paracetamol tablets that have  500Mg on it, but when tested in laboratory the actual milligram is 100 instead of 500.

He noted that the prices of medicine in the market are responsible for many deaths in the country because every Liberian should have about a dollar to live, adding, but if a Liberian does not have a dollar for one day than how will that person be able to buy medicine that worth US$10?.

He cautions Liberians against the kind of medicine to take because the quality of medicine has nothing to do with one’s economic status. According to Mr. Sumo, the Liberian health system does not have the requisite Laboratory to establish whether a person died of sub- standard medicine or not.

Commenting on sanitizers, particularly hands washing, he said the water being used for hands washing in Liberia needs to be 0.05 concentrated before washing hands and it should not be overly chlorinated because chlorine poisoning leads to the signs and symptoms of Ebola. “And even in the various communities people do not know how to chlorinate their wells”, he added.

He said that most Liberians use “make it tick” to season food, which affects the brain and leads to untimely death. “And also, the quality of water we drink needs to be tested for heavy metal.” Mr. Sumo warns against selling drugs in buckets in the streets because it is very dangerous.

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