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Weah resigns

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The New Dawn Liberia The New Dawn LiberiaBarely three days to President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf’s 15 days ultimatum for all presidential appointees vying for elected pots to quit the government, Liberia’s Peace and Reconciliation Ambassador, George Weah, has resigned his post after serving the government for about a year.

Weah’s resignation Tuesday, 11 November comes as he prepares to battle candidate Robert Alvin Sirleaf, son of the President for Montserrado County in the pending Special Senatorial Election scheduled for December 16, 2014. Mr. Sirleaf is vying for the Montserrado seat as an Independent candidate.

President Johnson-Sirleaf had earlier issued an ultimatum for all presidential appointees seeking election in the impending senatorial race to resign before 15 November. It is not known whether the President’s son, who serves as her senior advisor, has resigned accordingly.

In his resignation communication to President Sirleaf, Weah expressed thanks and appreciation for the opportunity afforded him to serve the people of Liberia and for the level of cooperation received from the government during his tenure.

Meanwhile, the CDC senatorial candidate has clarified that he is not wanted by any state securities in Liberia or any part of the world.

“In your newspaper, they said I’m wanted; there’s no country that is looking for me. I’m George Weah; I have done nothing wrong to any nation or anyone; I’m a peaceful citizen of the world. You can run your propaganda in your newspaper; you can call me (a) wanted man; I’m not wanted. I have the responsibility to speak to the young people of Liberia to do everything peacefully; it doesn’t mean they are weak,” Weah noted.

The ex-football icon turned politician made these comments on Monday in Monrovia, an hour following the release of the party’s youth league chairman, Mr.  Jefferson Koijii, from the Monrovia Center Prison on the alleged flogging of partisan Montgomery.

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