Red Cross applauds volunteers sacrifices

The Liberian National Red Cross (LNRCS) says it is pleased to join the rest of the world in recognizing the celebrating the bravery and achievements of its community – based volunteers whose selfless efforts are reassuring the institution’s commitment to humanity.

In a statement released Tuesday, 4 December ahead of the International Volunteer Day (IVD) which is 5 December, the LNRCS says it is present in every district of Liberia’s 15 counties through its network of over 3,500 community-based volunteers often on the frontline of humanitarian emergencies.

“Their tireless efforts in the toughest times of emergency and life threatening circumstances, and hours of work in the rain and sun to bring relief to the dying have not gone unnoticed,” the Red Cross says.The Red Cross recognizes that some of its volunteers have died while on duty, and many more have suffered physical and emotional injuries while helping affected communities.

From social mobilization to building capacity for resilient communities, providing first aid and health care services, improving access to sanitation and safe water, among others, the LNRCS says its community-based volunteers are always passionate, motivated and committed to serve and restore hope and dignity for the most affected.

According to the LNRCS, this international volunteer day is an opportunity to recognize and appreciate the roles of its community – based volunteers are playing in enabling their society to become the largest local humanitarian service provider in Liberia.

The Red Cross reaffirms that its commitment is to work with governments and partners to better protect, promote and recognize the critical role its volunteers play, often in the face of great personal sacrifice.

“The courage and sense of solidarity it takes to put one’s own suffering aside and take action to help others is quite remarkable. Time and again, it’s the volunteers who roll up their sleeves, wrap reassuring arms over the shoulders of distressed neighbors and put their hearts into meaning things better,” the Red Cross continues.

It notes that as humanitarian environments around the world become more complex, volunteering in these contexts become more challenging and dangerous, adding that volunteers in these contexts often make a significant and meaningful difference and yet they come from some of the poorest communities and are often facing their own significant challenges and trauma.

“They are often as vulnerable as the people they support. This is why we need to protect them,” the Red Cross concludes.

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